Reviews

A piece of paradise

If you have done the island hopping in Phuket and you just want a quick 30 min speedboat ride to a beautiful little secluded island then Coral island ..

Wonderful Diving Trip at Phuket- Merlin Divers - Kamala Diving Center

Its great time of diving trip at Phuket with Merlin Diver. My freinds and I participate the discovery dive program of Merlin Diver on Dec 2011. It is ..

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Dos & Don’ts

Dos & Don’ts
When visiting any country, you need to respect the local people and their customs. Thailand is no different though Thais are generally a very tolerant and hospitable people. You should be aware of a few simple guidelines to avoid accidentally offending people you meet. A smile will you get you a long way, and people will tolerate most slip-ups from a foreigner, as long as it doesn't involve the monarchy or religion.
•     Thailand is a Buddhist country where Buddha images are held sacred. Sacrilegious acts are punishable by imprisonment even if committed by foreign visitors.
•     Thai people hold their King and Queen and the Royal Family in great reverence, and so won't tolerate foreigners showing disrespect to them.
•     Generally Thai women are conservative. So don't touch them without their consent.
•     Dress properly when entering a Buddhist temple. Miniskirts and shorts are not allowed. Take your shoes off before going inside the hall of worship. Ladies must not on any account touch a Buddhist monk, give things direct to him or receive things direct from him.
•     Intimacies between man and woman should not be shown in public. Sunbathing in the nude is prohibited.
•     Call Thais their first names; use the title "Khun" for adults.
•     Normally, Thai people address others by their first names and with the title 'khun'. So don't be surprised if you are addressed as 'Khun Mary' or 'Khun John' instead of by your surname.
•     Traditionally, Thais greet each other with a wai (by pressing the palms together at the chest). If someone wais you, you should wai back (except wai-ed by a child).
•     Thai people smile to express gladness and happiness, to thank for small services, to return the wai of children and inferior persons, and even to excuse small inconveniences.
•     Don't touch a person's head, nor ruffle his hair. The head is the noblest part of the body. A sincere apology should be offered immediately if you touch someone's head unintentionally.
•     Avoid placing your feet on the table while sitting. Never use your foot to point things out or to touch any part of the body of anyone, which is considered rude.
•     Entering a Thai house, you're expected to remove your shoes.